Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread)
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Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread)

December 1, 2019

Injera, Ethiopian sourdough flatbread with a slightly spongy texture used to scoop up meat and vegetable stews.

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Welcome back to how to make Ethiopian food at home.

Platter with different Ethiopian dishes

I’ve shared with you five Ethiopian recipes so far. How to make Niter Kibbeh (Ethiopian Spiced Butter), an essential ingredient when making wot or sauce for stew.

Niter Kibbeh (Ethiopian Spiced Butter)

Our family favorite, Doro Wot (Ethiopian Spicy Chicken Stew) served with hard-boiled eggs.

a pot with chicken and eggs in a red sauce

Siga Wot (Ethiopian Spicy Beef Stew) and Misir Wot (Ethiopian Spicy Lentils), which can be served with rice or even better, with traditional Ethiopian injera.

What is Injera?

Injera is a large sourdough flatbread with a slightly spongy texture, originating from the Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia.

Large pieces of this flatbread are used as a serving dish, placing the different wot or stews on top and tearing smaller pieces to scoop up the food.

The injera soaks up the juices as the meal progresses. When this edible plate is eaten, the meal is officially over.

Ingredients for Injera

Traditionally, injera is made with two ingredients, teff flour, and water. Teff is a tiny, round grain that grows well in the highlands of Ethiopia. While teff is very nutritious, it contains practically no gluten.

Teff flour can be found in different health food stores in the US, or on Amazon.

As you can see, teff flour is on the expensive side, for that reason I’m using a mixture of rice and teff flour to make this gluten-free injera.

I’ve been making Ethiopian food for many years using this cookbook, Exotic Ethiopian Cooking, which has a variety of injera recipes with different grains.

Living in South America and not having access to teff for many years, I’ve tried a few of those recipes.

How to Make Gluten-Free Injera at Home

I’ve tried making injera at home for many years now.

I make a big Ethiopian feast for my husband’s birthday every year and invite our friends to enjoy it with us, and that means, lots of injera (remember? it’s used as a utensil!)

To make injera at home you need to plan ahead. If you are starting from zero, meaning you don’t have a starter, you’ll need about 5 to 14 days.

I haven’t been very smart throughout the years and haven’t saved some of the sourdough starter, so I usually need to start from zero every time :(.

I start a month before our delicious Ethiopian feast, just to make sure I have a good starter and then I keep it in the fridge.

The steps are simple. But I do recommend that you print out the recipe and mark the steps you’ve already done.

You’ll notice that this a small recipe, you can use this as a guide and double it as needed.

Cooking and Serving Ethiopian Injera

Injera is cooked in a mitad, a big, round griddle like pan.

If you are making injera often, I really recommend you get this griddle.

But, you can always cook it on a nonstick frying pan.

The trick is to clean the pan with salt and use a paper towel to wipe it before you add batter to the pan.

The other trick is to cook it on high heat.

I’ve made it using a regular griddle at 400F and that seems to work fine too.

Once cooked, place injera on a kitchen towel until completely cool, and then you can stack them on a plate.

Injera on a plate

Use this injera to cover a platter, place your favorite Ethiopian wot on top and serve more on the side to scoop up your food. Enjoy!

If you liked the recipe above, please consider rating the recipe and leaving a comment below! and share your picture on Instagram with the hashtag #chipabythedozen

Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread)
Prep Time
6 hrs
Cook Time
10 mins
 

Injera, Ethiopian sourdough flatbread with a slightly spongy texture used to scoop up meat and vegetable stews.

Course: Bread
Cuisine: Ethiopian
Servings: 18 7.5″ injera
Author: Lizet Bowen
Ingredients
  • Day 1
  • 2 tablespoons teff flour
  • 2 tablespoons rice flour
  • a pinch of dried yeast (half of 1/8 teaspoon)
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 3 tablespoons water to cover the dough
  • Day 2
  • 2 tablespoons teff flour
  • 2 tablespoons rice flour
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons water to cover the dough
  • Day 3
  • 2 tablespoons teff flour
  • 2 tablespoons rice flour
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons water to cover the dough
  • Day 4
  • 2 tablespoons teff flour
  • 2 tablespoons rice flour
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons water to cover the dough
  • Day 5
  • 2 tablespoons injera dough
  • 3/4 cup water for cooking
  • 1/2 cup water to make a batter
Instructions
  1. Day 1: In a small plastic container mix: 2 tablespoons teff flour, 2 tablespoons rice flour, yeast and 3 tablespoons water. This should look like a wet dough. Add 3 tablespoons of water to cover the dough. Cover with a kitchen towel until the next day.

  2. Day 2: With a spoon, mix starter. Add 2 tablespoons teff flour, 2 tablespoons rice flour, and 2 tablespoons water. This should look like a wet dough. Add 2 tablespoons of water to cover the dough. Cover with a kitchen towel until the next day.

    container with injera batter
  3. Day 3 and 4: With a spoon, mix starter. Add 2 tablespoons teff flour, 2 tablespoons rice flour, and 2 tablespoons water. This should look like a wet dough. Add 2 tablespoons of water to cover the dough. Cover with a kitchen towel until the next day.

    container with injera batter
  4. Day 5: With a spoon, mix starter. Take 2 tablespoons of the starter and add it to a small saucepan with 3/4 cup water. Cook over low heat until thick (pudding-like texture). Let it cool completely and add it to the rest of the starter. Add 1/2 cup water, mix well and cover with a kitchen towel until the next day.

    container with injera batter
  5. Day 6: At this point, you can keep your injera batter in the fridge until you are ready to cook. If you see any lumps, use an electric blender and blend it for a minute, or until smooth.

  6. Cooking injera: Place a shallow, nonstick pan over high heat. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to the pan, use a paper towel to scrub the pan (gently). Wipe the salt from the pan (you can keep it in a small bowl and reuse it). Add about 1/4 cup of batter to the pan, making sure it covers the whole pan. It should start bubbling. Let it cook for about 20 seconds and cover with a lid. Cook for another 20 seconds. Lift up the lid and cook until edges start to curl up (about 10 to 15 minutes). Remove injera from pan and place them on a kitchen towel (don't stack them yet) until completely cool.

Recipe Notes

Remember to save at leat 1/4 cup of your starter for next time!

Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread)

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